Sample Term Paper On Linguistics

Homework Question on Term Paper On Linguistics

  1. With reference to your notes (‘Children’s knowledge of structure’), compose in your own words, a discussion of what is involved in the formation of Yes-No questions by children:Forming yes-no questions involves knowledge of NP structure. Show how this is the case, i.e., as follows:
  • Consider simple sentence-pairs, such as The man can sing – Can the man sing? and lay out two hypotheses that might account for such pairs, one involving NP, the other not.
  • State which hypothesis a neutral scientist would prefer and why. Consider more complex sentences, such as The man who can play piano can sing. Show what yes-no question will occur if we apply the hypothesis without an NP.
  • Then show what yes-no question will occur if we apply the hypothesis with an NP.
  • Describe briefly an experiment with children. Conclude that children must have knowledge of structure (NP). Include a tree diagram of the example sentence: The man who can play piano can sing.

TERM PAPER, INCLUDING TREE DIAGRAM, MUST BE:

  • 2 PAGES MAX,
  • TYPED (tree does not need to be typed)

Homework Answer on Lingistics Term Paper On Linguistics

Children’s understanding of structure has to do with NPs in the yes-no questions. In instances where sentences are additionally declarative without the application of the NP, children tend to become confused. Though declarative sentences may be similar in every way with the NP sentences, lack of the abstract notion NP confuses a child, as the sentence is more overt. A sentence may be perfectly defined through declaration.

In the formation of Yes-No questions by children, the subject, and the verb switch places, contrary to the normal subject –verb agreement, which applies the structure of a NP. In questions, the reverse is the verb-subject order. In simple sentences like:

The man can sing – Can the man sing?

The two main hypotheses to account for the differences are:

Homework Help

Ho– go through the sentence until you first touch on ‘can, could, will, should’

H1– go through the sentence until you first touch on ‘can, could, will, should’ following the NP then you move it in front.

In applying the hypothesis, we derive the words, ‘the man’ which can be represented by the word, ‘he’. The first hypothesis lacks NP structure while the second hypothesis applies the structure.