Sample Literature Coursework Paper on Oppressions

Oppressions

Oppressions

            Numerous similarities are evident in the writings of Black Hawk and Red Jacket. Both writings express a reality of how enslavement affected people of color. This is quite evident in the opening statements of Black Hawk’s narrative. A narration is given of how as a family, the writer was sold into Delaware State and of how he awoke to perceive his poor, wretched and undone state (Kendall, 2007). Black Hawk applies words such as sold, poor, wretched and undone to express the condition of the bondage. These words are relevant as they portray the meaning of living on slavery in an American State. Red Jacket’s writing similarly applies language that defines similar condition of the natives. This language depicts the condition in which individuals are denied opportunities due to their race. According to Red Jacket’s writings, a life where denial of an individual’s opportunities to enjoy the wide useful and scientific knowledge is not worth living. Words used include ‘wretched’ to define the miserable condition and the effect that the condition had on people. In Black Hawk’s writing, a condition is articulated where slavery is the defining condition in an African American life. Red Jacket, on the other hand, articulates that any life deprived of opportunity is not worth living.

            Maria Stewart’s words and Anne Hutchison’s words are quite similar as they address similar social issues. Stewart’s words express women’s voice and mobility by emphasizing on identity and space (McMichael & Leonard, 2011). Her language of movement and spatiality define the relationship between mobility and knowledge and liberty and power. Hutchinson’s words similarly emphasize identity and space of women by expressing the need for freedom in religion in relation to women’s role in the society. Notes on, “Reading in Historical Context” greatly facilitates clear comprehension of the struggle the natives had on issues such as race and religion. The narrative richly defines life in the past using clear and rich language. This aspect confirms the unequalled skills and experience the authors had. Use of descriptive words further confirms real life situations authors include in the narrative.

References

Kendall, J. (2007). Peace, Friendship, and Financial Panic: Reading the Mark of Black Hawk in

Life of Ma-Ka-Tai-Me-She-Kia-Kiak. American Literary History. Pp 771-799.

McMichael, G. & Leonard, J. S. (2011). Concise anthology of American literature. (Eds.). New

York, NY: Pearson Education, Inc. ISBN-13: 978-0-205-76311-5