Sample Essay on Homeland Security Course Preparation Guide (CPG)

Homeland Security Course Preparation Guide (CPG)

Chapter #:  ______________     Chapter Title:  ____________________________

  1. The main purpose of this material (chapter, article, book, video, etc.) is………………

The main purpose of Clark’s material is to offer the steps to be used in solving an intelligence problem. Clark’s material describes the process of utilizing a target centered intelligence cycle.

The main purpose of  Keithly’s material is to fully explain the concept behind the American system of intelligence. The author describes the process, the components and methods as well as the outlook of intelligence in the U.S.  

The main purpose of Jensen Chapter 7 is to fully explain the history, elements, criticisms and improvements that can be done on the intelligence cycle.   

  • The key question addressed in this material is………………

The key question addressed in Clark’s material is how to solve an intelligence problem by means of a target.

The key question addressed in Keithly’s material is the description of intelligence prerequisites. In his mind, Keithly had in mind the process, requirements and the outlook of intelligence as utilized in the United States.

The key question addressed in Jansen chapter 7 is how the intelligence cycle can be used effectively and whether there are any improvements that may make it more effective.

  • The context of this material is…………

Clark’s material is surrounded by the history of the failures in the U.S government. Its background is equally surrounded by some of the intelligence situations in different governments of the world.

Keithly’s material appears to reflect back to the times when intelligence was initially considered an important part in the governments that had global interests in the World War II and terrorism.

Jensen Chapter 7 is based on the history of intelligence in the United States, especially during the World War I and II.

  • The most important information in this material is………………

The most important information in Clark’s material is the use of cases like the Escobar. He equally uses data from the United States intelligence section.

The most important information in Keithly’s material is the intelligence cycle. The author uses facts from past occurrences, and innovations by the United States government in relation to intelligence. He uses data from the technological advancement in the 20th century. In his experience, he concludes that analysts should go beyond the limits of being bound by inflexible requirements of intelligence, but utilize all the required resources for accuracy.

The most important information in Jansen Chapter 7 is the data obtained from the occurrences of the World War I and II. The author equally obtains information from other writers to support his arguments.

  • The main point(s) of view presented in this material is/are…………

The main point of view in Clark’s material is the fact that intelligence can never be effective unless it is target-centric.

The main point of view in Keithly’s material is the fact that intelligence must be treated with utmost caution. In his view, Keithly regards intelligence as vulnerable if the governments of the world fail to put in more effort in sealing loopholes including the use of machines without the efforts of humans.

The main point of view in Jansen Chapter 7 is the fact that the intelligence cycle can be improved for more accuracy and efficiency.

  • The main assumption(s) underlying the reasoning in this material is/are……….

The main assumption underlying the reasoning in Clarke’s material is his view on the fact that only target-centric intelligence is crucial in the society today.

The main assumption underlying the reasoning in Kethly’s material is his thought of utilization of trained expertise other than automation in the process of finding intelligence.

In his material, Jansen generalizes the fact that the intelligence cycle can either contain 5 or 6 steps.

  • The key concept(s) in this material is/are…………….

Clarke clearly explains the importance of targets during intelligence. In his view, a target-centric intelligence cycle is likely to offer more accurate results than the traditional intelligence cycles. He gives definitions of target-centric intelligence and the sources of information for intelligence.

The key concepts in Kathly’s material are the types of intelligence, the process, and the outlook of intelligence. The author brings out the idea that intelligence stands out as one of the most crucial factors that must be considered in governments and societies. Kathly views intelligence information as very significant especially in governments, country economies, as well as individual and society safety. In his views, intelligence has a cycle, which contains six phases. These are direction and planning, collection, processing and exploitation, production, dissemination and integration, and continuous evaluation. He also defines the components and methods of intelligence hence identifying the function of humans in intelligence matters. Kathly believes that human expertise is much needed in the process of gathering important data for intelligence purposes.

The key concepts in Jansen material are the history, elements, and criticisms of the intelligence cycle. In his view, wrong decisions in the past have been influenced by misleading information. According to Jansen, the IC personnel should reformulate questions during data collection to improve accuracy during the utilization of the intelligence cycle. The intelligence cycle can either contain five or six steps.   

  • The alternative(s) considered in this material is/are………… 

The alternative considered in Clarke’s material is the transformation of the traditional intelligence cycle into a target-centric cycle.

The alternative considered in Kathly’s material is to avoid disruption of the enemy’s transmissions. In his view, communication networks should be left open to provide additional information that can be used for intelligence purpose.

The alternative considered in Jansen’s material is the alteration of the intelligence cycle to ensure proper distribution, interpretation and utilization by the decision makers.

  • The main inferences and/or interpretations of this material are……….. 

Clarke makes a discovery that the intelligence cycle is almost treated as a theological concept. He thinks that no one tends to question its validity hence leading to inaccuracy.

According to Keithly’s material, technology and machines are important in intelligence. However, trained expertise is considered as more important for the sake of accuracy. Keithly brings out the fact that there has been an improvement in the area of analysis since analysts are less bound by rigid intelligence.

In his material Jansen brings out the fact that the intelligence cycle has worked well in the conversion of information into beneficial information that may be used for the purpose of intelligence.

  1.  
  2. If the author’s line of reasoning is taken seriously, the implications and consequences are…… 

If Clarke’s line of reasoning is taken seriously, governments are likely to realize better intelligent results unlike in the past. Clarke expresses the fact that a target-centric cycle when taken seriously will offer a solution to more complex problems in countries.

If Keithly’s line of reasoning is taken seriously, there will be improved security, increased human involvement in intelligence as well as maximum utilization of the available resources by the intelligence teams.

If Jansen’s line of reasoning is taken seriously, there will be an improvement in the accuracy of information offered for intelligence in governments and organizations.

  • If the author’s line of reasoning is not taken seriously, the implications and consequences are……..

If Clarke’s line of reasoning is not taken seriously, the complex intelligence problems in countries are not likely to be handled as required.

If Keithly’s line of reasoning is not taken seriously, the implications and consequences are that the intelligence systems of the governments of the world will fail hence opening room for attacks. In addition, intelligence systems are likely to remain porous and vulnerable leading to failed economies, and states.

If Jansen’s line of reasoning is not taken seriously, there is a likelihood that the information obtained from the sources will fail to serve its purpose.