Ethics Essay Sample on How The Daodejing Is Connected To Virtue Ethics

HOW THE DAODEJING IS CONNECTED TO VIRTUE ETHICS

Introduction

The Daoism is a complex piece of writing that makes clear interpretations of various factors in the Chinese contexts. This is done by integrating culture, religion and philosophies to draw various conclusions in the context of religion and the society as well as man and nature. Different aspects have been focused on  in the text giving a wide range of views in interpreting culture and society. Some of these views have been illustrated in this document.  

Erin, M. C. (2004). Two Interpretattions of the de in Daodejing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy, 1 (2), 219–233.

Erin M., Cline is a presidential doctoral scholar at the department of philosophy at the University of Baylor. Erin specializes in comparative philosophy and ethics and has made a number of publications concerning various events taking place in the philosophical world.  Erin, in the article gives two illustrations to the meaning of de in the Dao de Jing. The first meaning, as Erin notes refer to ‘Virtue’ which can be expressed in various forms and in different contexts. The second definition Erin gives to De in the Dao de Jing society is an event that could be arising from various positions or may be autogenerative. This article presents a d ifferent view from other articles that have defined the term within its context of usage[1]. Erin combines both the contextual and social references of the term as used in the common Chinese conversational contexts. Erin’s definition is more informed with reagard to defining the term de in the text by mixing the contexts of application compared to other articles that have observed the same aspect.

Kile, J. (2008). The Philosophy of the Daodejing. The International Journal of the Asian Philosophical Association , 1 (1), 20-36.

Kile is a scholar and a professorial fellow at the M.T.S. Boston University. Kile’s background in philosophical studies puts him at a vantage point in addressing the contents of Dao de Jing by integrating different perspectives in it.  According to Kile, the primary philosophy behind the references made in the philosophy of the Dao de Jing is primarily concerned with presenting the scholars primarily the western scholars as those faced with numerous difficulties including the difficulty of integrating numerous ideas in finding the right interpretation of various contexts[2]. The Daoism presents western scholars as those concerned mainly with the narrow definitions of events and tends to omit the small and useful concepts thus not practicing proper ethics. Kile’s definition is a powerful presentation of the main philosophical concerns of the Daoism as he gives it a westernized point of view given the fact that himself is a western fellow.      

Hektor, K. T. Yan. (2009). A paradox of Virtue: The Daodejing on virtue and moral philosophy. Philosophy East & West , 59 (2), 173–187.

Yan is a professor and lecturer at the department of Public and Social Administration at the University of Hong Kong, China. His position as a scholar and an administrator puts him at the best position to carry put sound researches on social concerns in the public domains[3]. Yan, in his illustrations of the paradox of virtue as expressed in Daoism bases his arguments on different but specific chapters of the book. For instance, he asserts that the book views virtue as a question concerned with the moral motivation which is related to the aspects of philosophy in general. According to Yan, the Daoism mainly presented the paradox in the form of virtues that exists between the west and the east based on the differences in the philosophical reasoning and consideration in the two contexts. There exists a very different philosophical concern expressed between the west and the east. Concerning this aspect Yan gives his expressions in the context of the east and illustrating his views about the western considerations as discussed in the context of the Daoism. This gives a more sound approval of his presentations since Yan, an easterner, is in a position to interpret the paradox that exists between the two regions in this context.

Goldin, P., (2005). Why Daoism is Not Environmentalism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy, 32 (1), 75-88.

Goldin is an environmentalist and a philosophy professor at the University of Hong Kong. Goldin has written many publications comparing the philosophical views between the west and the east and relating these to the current position of the world.  Goldin, in his arguments considers the various implications of the Zhuangzi commonly referred to as the Chuang Tzu in the Chinese context in an attempt to illustrate the environmental concerns as brought out in the Daoism. Considering the contemporary environmental challenges as expressed in the text, Goldin illustrates that although the Chuang does not provide a clear illustration to the environmental concerns addressed, it helps in promoting integration and ethical environmental mechanisms that are harmonious with the contemporary society and promotes a healthy relationship expected between man and the nature surrounding him[4]. Goldin, an environmentalist, tends to interpret the propositions of the Daoism from an environmental perspective, thus the soundness of his judgments compared to other social and philosophical interpretations of the text.

Karolina, E. (2009, Fall). The Role of Daoism in Environmental Ethics in China. Master Thesis: University of Hong Kong, 4-47.

Karolina is a master’s graduate of the University of Hong Kong with a degree in Chinese religion and philosophical studies. She has carried out a comprehensive research on the focus of the Daoism in environmental protection and conservation. In this thesis report, Karolina focuses on the concerns of the Daoism on environmental conservation and protection from a religious point of view. She asserts that the Daoism used religious philosophies to entrench environmental concerns in the minds of the people, thus drawing a concrete relationship between man and his immediate environment from an ethics point of view[5]. Karolina’s expensive research and philosophical interpretations given in the book is more illustrative and conclusive compared to several other articles. The fact that she combines both religious philosophies and religious views in environmental expressions by the Daoism gives this article a sound and well illustrated finding.   

Conclusion

The Daoism provides an illustration for a wide array of contextual aspects putting the society in charge of the environment through philosophy. By giving various interpretations to the aspect of virtue and relating these to the society’s role in managing nature, the Daoism presents an illustrative and conclusive interpretation of the society noting the differences in philosophical concerns between the different societies.

References

Erin, M. C. (2004). Two Interpretattions of the de in Daodejing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy , 1 (2), 219–233.

Goldin, P. ,. (2005). Why Daoism is Not Environmentalism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy , 32 (1), 75-88.

Hektor, K. T. (2009). A paradox of Virtue: The Daodejing on virtue and moral philosophy. Philosophy East & West , 59 (2), 173–187.

Karolina, E. (2009, Fall ). The Role of Daoism in Environmental Ethics in China. Master Thesis: University of Hong Kong , 4-47.

Kile, J. (2008). The Philosophy of the Daodejing. The International Journal of the Asian Philosophical Association , 1 (1), 20-36.


[1] Erin, M. C. (2004). Two Interpretattions of the de in Daodejing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy , 1 (2), 219–233.

[2] Kile, J. (2008). The Philosophy of the Daodejing. The International Journal of the Asian Philosophical Association , 1 (1), 20-36.

[3] Hektor, K. T. Yan. (2009). A paradox of Virtue: The Daodejing on virtue and moral philosophy. Philosophy East & West , 59 (2), 173–187.

[4] Goldin, P., (2005). Why Daoism is Not Environmentalism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy, 32 (1), 75-88.

[5] Karolina, E. (2009, Fall). The Role of Daoism in Environmental Ethics in China. Master Thesis: University of Hong Kong, 4-47.