Essay Writing Help on Error Correction/Analysis

Error Correction/Analysis

Aarnoutse, C., & Schellings, G. (2003). Learning Reading Strategies by Triggering Reading Motivation. Educational Studies, 29(1), 387-409.

The authors evaluate a program used by third graders integrating reading instructions. They believe the program provides an open learning situation encouraging learners to formulate a problem and solution themselves. This prompts them to collect and read information in order to solve out the issues and present the results. Consequently, the teacher assists by either explaining or demonstrating reading strategies helpful in gaining literacy skills. These strategies involve correction of grammar errors in writing, reading and speaking. Thus, the program is beneficial as learners can acquire knowledge and use it to read and speak without grammar errors.  This is a strategy motivating learners to improve their literacy skills which include writing, reading and comprehending second language informational materials without grammar errors. Thus, the authors advocate that error correction can enhance the process of teaching and learning second language.

Archambault, I., Eccles, J. S., & Vida, M. N. (2010). Ability Self-Concepts and Subjective Value in Literacy: Joint Trajectories from Grades 1 through 12. Journal of Educational Psychology, 102(4), 804–816.

The authors sought to examine changes among students’ perceptions in relation to their literate abilities and values of reading, writing, and learning a second language. They discovered students’ perceptions tend to weaken as they spend more time in school. This study therefore strives to determine if heterogeneity among learners and instructors can motivate literacy. This is because children have divergent trajectories of change in literacy subjective task value. More so, their abilities in relation to self-concepts and interests differ. It is therefore crucial for individuals to feel motivated across gender and socioeconomic issues to learn and understand corrections emphasize developing, and achieving motivational learning.

This journal article however fails to affirm if correcting persons learning and speaking a second language can improve their literacy skills. It neither allows nor prohibits instructors from correcting grammar errors among second language speakers. It is however vital to correct grammar errors as it improves their capacity to write, read, and understand hence speak fluently.

Carlisle, J. F. (2010). Effects of Instruction in Morphological Awareness on Literacy Achievement: An Integrative Review. Reading Research Quarterly, 45(4), 464–487.

The author integrated the findings acquired from various studies to determine how instructions in morphological awareness attribute to literacy improvement. Morphological awareness instructions can either be phonological or orthographical in relation to meanings derived from words and phrases. The author discovered that, morphological awareness contributes towards the teaching and learning process. Students are able to acquire and develop literacy skills enabling them to acquire deeper understanding. Consequently, they learn lexical spellings, which include meanings of affixes and base words. Thus, morphological awareness can address instructors’ issues as they strive to help students work out the meanings of unfamiliar words.

This journal article therefore affirms that, correcting grammar errors among second language speakers can enhance their literacy skills. Consequently, instructors’ efforts to improve learners’ abilities to write, read, and speak fluently can be achieved effectively.

Dymoke, S., & Hughes, J. (2009). Using a Poetry Wiki: How can the Medium Support Pre-Service Teachers of English in their Professional Learning about Writing Poetry and Teaching Poetry Writing in a Digital Age? English Teaching: Practice and Critique, 8(3), 91–106.

The authors investigated the impacts of poetry towards the teaching and learning processes in classrooms. They were mainly interested in determining how instructors perceive themselves as they teach students to write and read. They also determined how participants without experience could grow confidence in order to gain courage to seek help while learning. This enables instructors and students to collaborate ensuring grammatical errors and mistakes are reduced and eliminated.

The authors therefore believe learning to write and read poems can help learners to acknowledge and correct errors. Consequently, they can acquire high quality standards in learning grammar. This journal article is therefore applicable and relevant in effective grammar teaching. This is because it encourages instructors to correct grammar errors uttered by learners gaining literacy in a second language. More so, the journal article seeks to improve the quality of grammar taught and spoken among students learning a second language.

Enright, K. A. (2011). Language and Literacy for a New Mainstream. American Educational Research Journal, 48(1), 80–118.

The authors asserted classrooms are becoming increasingly diverse. Thus, educators have to recognize learners’ hybrid experiences in and across multiple communities and domains. Their diverse skills to research and write projects should focus on language and literacy as key patterns to learn language in school. They proposed instructors should reframe concepts of teaching languages to expand definitions across academic languages to achieve classrooms realities to acquire abilities to recognize and correct errors. As a result, they suggested teachers ought to acquire knowledge of the language and backgrounds or cultural experiences among students to influence their experiences and abilities in class. Consequently, they can adopt applicable measures they can utilize to correct grammar errors hindering students to acquire literacy skills in a second language.

Ferris, D. (2006). Feedback in Second Language Writing. USA, Cambridge University Press.

The author who is a teacher based at California State University attempts to gather evidence to discuss diverse effects of error feedback in writing English as a second language. The author provides different ways to correct students’ grammar errors while writing either in or outside the classroom. The author however only focuses on written errors. Thus, the findings from this source ought to be complemented and compared with articles focusing on correction of errors while reading and speaking. It however provides valuable insight on the effects of error corrections in the process of teaching and learning a second language through writing.

Gebhard, M. (2004). Fast Capitalism, School Reform, and Second Language Literacy Practices. The Modern Language Journal, 88(1), 245-265.

The author analyzes various mechanisms implemented among schools in form of reforms to ensure second-language learners and their families acquire literacy skills. The author believes that, school reforms and discussions are often constituted by “fast capitalism”. For example, second language learners enrolled diversely across elementary schools in California often faces challenges in grammar learning. This is because reform discussions in learning to read and write second language are accountable for undermining the students’ efforts and attempts to acquire literacy skills and practices. As a result, the students do not acquire adequate and skillful qualifications to meet their needs for learning the second language. Thus, educators teaching in ESL should focus and correct errors among the students. As a result, the process this of learning a second language can be enhanced.

Ivanic, R. (2004). Discourses of Writing and Learning to Write. Language and Education, 18(1), 220- 245.

The author conducts a meta-analysis of composition theory and research in order to identify various discourses applicable in analyzing approaches to teach writing and reading skills among second-language learners. Ivanic believes that, explicit teaching of phonics and accuracy can enhance levels of creativity among learners. This can encourage them to develop creative expressions enhancing the process and experience of teaching second language. The process involves mental and practical processes such as definition of explicit text-types. This fosters purposeful and contextual communications among students through constructed practices involving contestation, changes and critical awareness of grammar errors. Thus, the author advocates that educators teaching in ESL should focus and correct errors. Consequently, students can acquire comprehensive writing and reading skills improving their literacy in a second language. More importantly, the process of teaching can be enhanced.

Moje, E. B., Ciechanowski, K. M., Kramer, K., Ellis, L., Carrillo, R., & Callazo, T. (2004). Working toward a Third Space in Content Area Literacy: An Examination of Everyday Funds of Knowledge and Discourse. Reading Research Quarterly, 39(1), 38-70.

The authors analyze the relationship between students’ knowledgeable skills in a second language across various environments. This is because students exhibit different literacy skills at home, neighborhood community, with their friends, at work and in the classrooms. As a result, the authors advocate and encourage educators to develop measures able to identify instances students funds of knowledge either enhance or impede the learning process. Consequently, they can determine environments encouraging students to make grammar errors. Conversely, the educators can exploit their funds of knowledge in attempts to create a learning environment encouraging correction of errors.  This environment is called the “third space”. It can be established as home, school and community among peer members encouraging learners to identify and correct grammar errors. Consequently, the environments can enhance the process of learning a second language.

Ibarrola, A. (2009). Reformulation and Self-Correction: Testing the Validity of Correction Strategies in the Classroom. Revista Española de Lingüística Aplicada, 22(1), 189-215.

The author who is also a teacher seeks to test different and valid strategies of correcting grammar errors. She asserts that, the strategy of self-correction is often less effective and invalid than reformulation. She therefore advocates that, educators should correct errors among students. Conversely, students should avoid correcting their won grammar errors as she believes this strategy can enhance the process of learning second language

Mishra, K. (2005). Correction of errors in English: a training course for the teachers of English as a Second Language. New Delhi, Oscar Publications.

The author is an English teacher based in India with several practical techniques applicable in helping students to accept and learn a second language based on the common errors they make. Mishra believes the errors can discourage the students. As a result, language teachers should use the errors to motivate students in order to learn from their grammar mistakes. Thus, the author considers grammar errors as a motivational factor keeping students interested while encouraging them to learn from error corrections.

References

Aarnoutse, C., & Schellings, G. (2003). Learning Reading Strategies by Triggering Reading Motivation. Educational Studies, 29(1), 387-409.

Archambault, I., Eccles, J. S., & Vida, M. N. (2010). Ability Self-Concepts and Subjective Value in Literacy: Joint Trajectories from Grades 1 through 12. Journal of Educational Psychology, 102(4), 804–816.

Carlisle, J. F. (2010). Effects of Instruction in Morphological Awareness on Literacy Achievement: An Integrative Review. Reading Research Quarterly, 45(4), 464–487.

Dymoke, S., & Hughes, J. (2009). Using a Poetry Wiki: How can the Medium Support Pre-Service Teachers of English in their Professional Learning about Writing Poetry and Teaching Poetry Writing in a Digital Age? English Teaching: Practice and Critique, 8(3), 91–106.

Enright, K. A. (2011). Language and Literacy for a New Mainstream. American Educational Research Journal, 48(1), 80–118.

Ferris, D. (2006). Feedback in Second Language Writing. USA, Cambridge University Press.

Gebhard, M. (2004). Fast Capitalism, School Reform, and Second Language Literacy Practices. The Modern Language Journal, 88(1), 245-265.

Ibarrola, A. (2009). Reformulation and Self-Correction: Testing the Validity of Correction Strategies in the Classroom. Revista Española de Linguistic Aplicada, 22(1), 189-215.

Mishra, K. (2005). Correction of errors in English: a training course for the teachers of English as a Second Language. New Delhi, Oscar Publications.

Moje, E. B., Ciechanowski, K. M., Kramer, K., Ellis, L., Carrillo, R., & Callazo, T. (2004). Working toward a Third Space in Content Area Literacy: An Examination of Everyday Funds of Knowledge and Discourse. Reading Research Quarterly, 39(1), 38-70.