Architecture Essay Paper on Paris in the Nineteenth Century

Paris in the Nineteenth Century

The architecture in Paris started initially as display, but later turned Paris into a town. Paris is among the cities that came up as a site for voyeurism and display. This article seeks to explain how the design of theatrium and interior stair of Paris Opera by Charles Garnier and the Bon Marche department store by Boileau and Gustave Eiffel facilitated the growth of fashion trends.

Commodities such as physical beauty products, concepts of social status, self-pride, and wealth were displayed through artwork pieces. The trend exercised in Paris continued to grow and developed into new cultural ways.The grand staircase has a convex, concave and straight section allowing the opera lover to enjoy the balconies on each level, admiring each other and loving the show before the performance[1]. The aristocrats of the Paris Society arrived at the theatre with crinolines and evening coats, going up the steps to display their fashion as they headed to the boxes Amphitheatre, and orchestra. The sight naturally dazzled visitors with the grand staircase, flanked with 30 monolithic marble columns leading the eye to the ceiling frescoes and providing the people with a place to visit and hang out.

The Bon Marche department store by Gustave Eiffel and L.A. Boileau, is one of the sitings that developed Paris into a more leisure-like place for visiting. The area had inexpensive fashion design products that were mostly for women and ultimately became run by women. The Bon Marche department store is a luminous assembly with a design that allowed solid architecture and the transverse graded surfaces and semi-lit depths surrounding was put on display. The beauty of this design attracted people to visit and while on the fun, they exhibited their fashion and purchased items on display.

Bibliography

Prendergast, Christopher. 1995. Paris and the nineteenth century.Oxford, UK: Blackwell.


[1]Prendergast, Christopher. 1995. Paris and the nineteenth century.Oxford, UK: Blackwell.